Project Details

Description

Around 2 billion people in the world regularly drink water that is not safe due to fecal contamination that puts them at high risk for waterborne diseases such as cholera, typhoid fever and other diarrheal diseases. diarrhea is one of the main causes of mortality of children under 5, with 58% of diarrhea-related diseases attributed to lack of access to drinking water, sanitation and hygiene. there is a real and urgent need to develop and deploy technologies that can easily and quickly determine if water sources are safe to drink. in the gcrf safewater project, the university of ulster has been working with partners in colombia, mexico and brazil to develop io devices that can be used to determine the microbiological quality of water in rural communities, which do not have access to microbiology laboratories or qualified staff the initial results with alpha prototypes are very promising and we have to accelerate the development of this technology so that it can be implemented at scale for the determination of water quality in other developing regions. the safewater translate project will develop beta prototypes and test these in brazil, colombia and mexico with our current safewater partners. we will also translate the technology for testing in ethiopia, malawi and nepal. at the end of 18 months, the objective is to have a robust solution for monitoring water quality in remote regions of the world that do not have access to laboratories or qualified personnel. around 2 billion people in the world regularly drink water that is not safe due to fecal contamination that puts them at high risk for waterborne diseases such as cholera, typhoid fever and other diarrheal diseases. diarrhea is one of the main causes of mortality of children under 5, with 58% of diarrhea-related diseases attributed to lack of access to drinking water, sanitation and hygiene. there is a real and urgent need to develop and deploy technologies that can easily and quickly determine if water sources are safe to drink. in the gcrf safewater project, the university of ulster has been working with partners in colombia, mexico and brazil to develop io devices that can be used to determine the microbiological quality of water in rural communities, which do not have access to microbiology laboratories or qualified staff the initial results with alpha prototypes are very promising and we have to accelerate the development of this technology so that it can be implemented at scale for the determination of water quality in other developing regions. the safewater translate project will develop beta prototypes and test these in brazil, colombia and mexico with our current safewater partners. we will also translate the technology for testing in ethiopia, malawi and nepal. at the end of 18 months, the goal is to have a robust solution for monitoring water quality in remote regions of the world that does not have access to laboratories or qualified personnel. around 2 billion people in the world regularly drink water that it is not safe due to fecal contamination that puts them at high risk for waterborne diseases such as cholera, typhoid fever and other diarrheal diseases. diarrhea is one of the main causes of mortality of children under 5, with 58% of diarrhea-related diseases attributed to lack of access to drinking water, sanitation and hygiene. there is a real and urgent need to develop and deploy technologies that can easily and quickly determine if water sources are safe to drink. in the gcrf safewater project, the university of ulster has been working with partners in colombia, mexico and brazil to develop io devices that can be used to determine the microbiological quality of water in rural communities, which do not have access to microbiology laboratories or qualified staff the initial results with alpha prototypes are very promising and we have to accelerate the development of this technology so that it can be implemented at scale for the determination of water quality in other developing regions. the safewater translate project will develop beta prototypes and test these in brazil, colombia and mexico with our current safewater partners. we will also translate the technology for testing in ethiopia, malawi and nepal. at the end of 18 months, the objective is to have a robust solution for monitoring water quality in remote regions of the world that do not have access to laboratories or qualified personnel. around 2 billion people in the world regularly drink water that is not safe due to fecal contamination that puts them at high risk for waterborne diseases such as cholera, typhoid fever and other diarrheal diseases. diarrhea is one of the main causes of mortality of children under 5, with 58% of diarrhea-related diseases attributed to lack of access to drinking water, sanitation and hygiene. there is a real and urgent need to develop and deploy technologies that can easily and quickly determine if water sources are safe to drink. in the gcrf safewater project, the university of ulster has been working with partners in colombia, mexico and brazil to develop io devices that can be used to determine the microbiological quality of water in rural communities, which do not have access to microbiology laboratories or qualified staff the initial results with alpha prototypes are very promising and we have to accelerate the development of this technology so that it can be implemented at scale for the determination of water quality in other developing regions. the safewater translate project will develop beta prototypes and test these in brazil, colombia and mexico with our current safewater partners. we will also translate the technology for testing in ethiopia, malawi and nepal. at the end of 18 months, the objective is to have a robust solution for monitoring water quality in remote regions of the world that do not have access to laboratories or qualified personnel.



Objective

To manufacture magnetic nanostructures of ferrites of znfe2o4, zn0.5ni0.5fe2o4 and nife2o4 for the generation of electrical energy by means of the seebeck effect by spins. develop robust pre-commercial devices (beta prototypes) for water quality analysis and testing in latin america, sub-saharan africa and south asia, based on user experience and algorithm development.

Expected results

Prototyping of the prototypes, field validation, international presentations, patenting and commercialization processes
StatusActive
Effective start/end date1/10/1930/04/21

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